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Posts Tagged ‘Garden’

Since tomorrow is Palm Sunday, and the weather should be beautiful, I decided to invite some friends over for a late lunch in my garden. First step is to repot some planters that are in serious need of help.

One of the planters that needs some attention is this long narrow one that goes on one of my tables.

Yikes, here’s what she looked like before. Pretty sad, huh?

I went to a local grower this morning and grabbed some simple succulents that looked good together. When planting a mix of succulents, I like to take them all out of their pots and remove any excess dirt. Then I place them all on a tray so that they’re easy to grab once planting begins.

For this long planter, I like to place a large more dramatic succulent in the middle, as the focal plant, and and then just add the same succulent on either side for symmetry. Super simple.

Once I was done planting and filling with extra dirt, I added some gravel I had handy, but it’s not necessary if you don’t have any.

Happy Saturday!

 

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Since Mondays are always a little difficult to stomach, I thought I would do a quick post on some of my favorite Pinterest pins from the weekend, along with my ideas behind them.

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Idea #1: A very clean and beautiful idea for a patio — using different size pavers, gravel to outline the seating area and trees to frame it!

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Idea #2: Paint a focal point wall a strong gorgeous color and then hang a collection.

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Idea #3: Add a picture shelf above the tub for artwork & candles.

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Idea #4: When designing a mother-in-law suite I sometimes have to include a small kitchenette — I like this idea of a small wall to separate main living area and kitchenette.Screen Shot 2016-03-13 at 2.01.07 PM

Idea #5: As many of us are looking for alternatives to grass these days, I love this simple and pretty idea of just rounded Pittosporum, bush germander and lavender. For those that want a bit more color, think about spreading plants out a bit more and adding your color in between.

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Idea #6: Another alternative to grass is adding some gravel, boxwood and a very zen like fountain — pretty.

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Idea #7: An easy way to add color and texture to a kitchen or bathroom is to add a fun and beautiful backsplash like the one in the photo above.

I hope this gave you a little inspiration as we head into another work week. Happy Monday!

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Lattice Works!

There are some really awesome materials out there that can make a huge difference in design! Of course, paint is probably at the top of my list, but another one that I have been experimenting with lately is — lattice.  It’s a great tool when wanting to disguise unsightly areas, like the white elephant next door. It can provide privacy, it can be used as a room divider, and of course can be used to grow something gorgeous on! So, this morning I combed through Pinterest to gather a few examples of how others have used this very versatile and inexpensive product. Hopefully, you can take away some ideas for your own garden.

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It can be installed on to the top of a shorter fence to become a perfectly tall wall to hide that white elephant next door. I love that they painted it all a dark color too! Nice!

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Here, painted and used as more of a decor element for interest

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Above, used to divide two spaces

 

More ideas below:

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Here, attached to a home in order to grow something lovely on it.

For more ideas for your garden, check out my board on Pinterest, “Ideas for your garden“.

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Boston Ivy

If you are wanting to add a bit of charm or elegance to your home, try planting a beautiful climber, such as a Rose, Hydrangea, or Clematis. Or, to cover a wall entirely, plant an ivy like Boston, Fig or Jasmine. It’s amazing what $35 dollars and a couple of years could do for the look and feel of your home.

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Fig Ivy and a Climbing Rose
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Boston Ivy

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Fig Ivy

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Climbing Rose

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Happy Friday!

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Creating a garden in an urban setting might seem tricky, but actually it can be quite easy. Recently, I was asked about some ideas for a very small urban garden, so I put together 4 simple steps that could help anyone interested in planning a garden in the city.

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Step 1: Figure Out Your Needs

Decide what you would enjoy most in your small urban space. Would you want an area to lounge around in, or would you rather it be more for entertaining? Would you like a sit down eating area? Do you need a place for a grill or maybe a water feature? Some of you may be able to include a couple of different areas, but for those with limited space, you may have to narrow it down to your 2 most important needs.

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Step 2: Figure out the Arrangement

Once you figure out your needs for your urban garden, the next thing to consider is your layout.  At this point, you should have some idea as to what furniture/items you will be using in your garden space. Begin with an overhead sketch of your space and arrange your areas including any furniture/items you are wanting to purchase. By planning ahead and figuring out your arrangement, you might end up eliminating something that isn’t absolutely necessary, as well as avoid returning any items.

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Step 3: Choose plants that fit your Lifestyle and Environment

If you have a busy lifestyle choose several large amazing plants/containers that make a statement and that are low maintenance — like proven shrubs, succulents and cacti.
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Step 4: Set up your areas

This is usually everyone’s favorite part, seeing it all come together!

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The picture above, of a very small courtyard, is a great example of using a small space wisely. The fig ivy on the wall for a bit of green, candles for ambiance, a love seat and chair for a conversational area, and a small table to place a book or beverage on. Perfect!

Other quick tips are:

lattice to help with any privacy issues,

fountains to drown out city noise,

& a mirror to make your space feel a lot bigger!

urban3The Ultimate Urban Jungle. A bit unruly but amazing at the same time. I can imagine parties out here would be quite wonderful.

If you would like more urban garden ideas, check out my board,”the urban garden”, on Pinterest!

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by London Fieldworks

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 If there is an exterior wall, or even a retaining wall, somewhere in your garden — think about adding a built-in bench to it

bench5  bench3The fabulous thing about using a built-in bench is that you can customize it to fit your space and style
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bench11 Add a thick base cushion, throw pillows, and plush blankets for total comfort
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Can you just picture yourself lounging here for hours? I can!

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A little garden inspiration heading into the weekend is Nicole de Vesian’s garden, La Louve (The She-Wolf). It’s located in Bonniuex, Provence France.

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After having a fashion career in Paris, Nicole de Vesian moved to Provence and designed the garden at age 69.

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The pool was later added by the current owner, Judith Pillsbury.

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This garden is one of my favorites, absolutely beautiful. One reason I adore it is that it feels very organized, as well as soft and calming. The green shades of the Rosemary, Boxwoods and Cypress’ mixed with the silver hues of the Sage, Santolina and Lavender work perfectly together.

Some of these photos are from Garden Design Magazine’s website, but if you have the chance to pick up Provence Interiors (by Angelika Muthesius) you will see many more that show the beauty of this garden.

Or you can click here, to check out more photos by Clive Nichols.

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The party took place at a friend’s house–a wonderful Tudor style home perched on a small hill in a very cute neighborhood. Candles placed in silver tins lined the pathway leading to the garden and the faint sound of jazz could be heard as you passed through the garden gates.

Karla, Ella and I

The hostess, Karla (food stylist, amazing cook and plant lover), and I started work on the garden about a month before the party.

Tree stumps were repurposed as small cocktail tables. A mirror hung on a wall reflecting the roaring fire. Old pieces of driftwood were turned into lamps. And a table, made by Karla’s husband, became the perfect place to set the wine and appetizers.

 The weather couldn’t have been more perfect. The smell of bacon-wrapped jalapenos filled the air and forty guests enjoyed a jazz quartet under a full moon.

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It was about ten years ago when I saw my first Black Lily. I was walking around my garden and noticed Walter (my Lab) had stopped dead in his tracks. He had realized something new had popped up in our little garden — a Black Lily! I had never seen anything like it before, it was amazing!

It was the Dracunculus Vulgaris (above) and is native to the Mediterranean. However, it is also known as the Black Arum, the Voodoo Lily, the Snake Lily, the Black Dragon, the Black Lily, Dragonwort, Ragon and the Stink Lily (because of its foul smell).

I was reminded of this recently because visiting Garden Design’s website, I came across an article entitled “Almost Black Plants” (photo below). I’ve been researching “black” plants lately and have been reminded of the elegant makeup of these plants. If you care to read more of the article in Garden Designclick here.

(1) Ornamental Sweet Potato Vine, (2) Small Cape Rush, (3) Black Cotton, (4) Hens & Chicks

Below, I have listed several more purple/black plants that I really enjoy.

Black Magic Elephant Ear, Colocasia Esculenta ‘Black Magic’. They can get 5 to 6 feet tall! I love to see these popping up behind something with structure, (like a dwarf yaupon or boxwood). Zones 7 to 10.

This is “Black Hens & Chicks” — a succulent that works both as a great ground cover and beautifully in a container. I love them in both settings. In places such as Southern California, this plant works great as a ground cover where frost isn’t a problem. In Central Texas, they work better in a container, especially mixed with succulents that are bright green. Zones 4 to 9.

This is the Black Mondo Grass or Ophiopogon Planiscapus ‘Nigrescens’ which is such an elegant looking plant. I know it’s just mondo grass but planted in front of a simple row of boxwood, it would be beautiful! Zones 5 to 10.

This is Purple Basil and is used the same way as Green Basil. It’s cultivated from ordinary Green Basil, so if you allow a green shoot to continue to grow, the plant will eventually turn completely green. It’s gorgeous in a salad!

All these plants are really exciting and a great addition to any garden. If you’re nervous about using them, play with them in a container first to get a feel for them and then transfer the idea to you garden.

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